How to Be Comfortable In Your Own Feathers

A Picture Book About Having a Healthy Body Image

$10.95

SKU: B185-Net

Teach Kids About Having Healthy Eating Habits

Bluebird, along with most everyone else at school, wants to flutter like the most popular bird in their class, Hummingbird.

“You should go on a diet, and work out at the gym.
You could flutter like me, if your body was thin.”

Bluebird takes this comment seriously and starts to develop unhealthy eating habits. Mom comes to the rescue by teaching Bluebird balance and by explaining that everyone needs to feel comfortable in their own feathers. With help from the Bird Doc and the Food Voice Counselor, Bluebird learns to control the Food Voice that is living inside.

“I’m working on balance one day at a time.
If I keep working hard, I should be just fine.”

How to be Comfortable in Your Own Feathers uses a creative approach to speak to children who may be currently struggling with body-image concerns. This story is written in a manner that gives children an opportunity to apply the characters’ experiences to their own lives. It also demonstrates appropriate adult responses that encourage the development of healthy eating habits. Includes “Live It” Dos and Don’ts.

Written by Julia Cook
Illustrated by Anita DuFalla
Paperback ISBN 9781937870133
Grades 3-6
32 pages
Release Date February 15, 2013

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Julia Cook

Julia Cook, M.S. is a award-winning children’s author, counselor, and parenting expert. She has presented in thousands of schools and speaks at education and counseling conferences nationally and internationally. Julia has published almost one hundred children’s books on a wide range of character and social development topics, and regularly contributes to print and television media about these topics. The goal behind Cook’s work is to actively involve young people in fun, memorable stories and teach them to become lifelong problem-solvers. Inspiration for her books comes from working with children and carefully listening to counselors, parents, and teachers, in order to stay on top of needs in the classroom and at home. Cook has the innate ability to enter the worldview of a child through storybooks, giving children both the “what to say” and the “how to say it.”

Julia Cook

Julia Cook, M.S. is a award-winning children’s author, counselor, and parenting expert. She has presented in thousands of schools and speaks at education and counseling conferences nationally and internationally. Julia has published almost one hundred children’s books on a wide range of character and social development topics, and regularly contributes to print and television media about these topics. The goal behind Cook’s work is to actively involve young people in fun, memorable stories and teach them to become lifelong problem-solvers. Inspiration for her books comes from working with children and carefully listening to counselors, parents, and teachers, in order to stay on top of needs in the classroom and at home. Cook has the innate ability to enter the worldview of a child through storybooks, giving children both the “what to say” and the “how to say it.”

A great and creative approach to educating children about accepting their bodies and encouraging them to admire how everyone is unique and different. How To Be Comfortable in Your Own Feathers can help children gain perspective when they compare themselves negatively to others, and teach them how to counter that perspective with acceptance and insight. Since eating disorders now are seen in increasing numbers in children as young as 5 or 6, this book is even more timely and needed!

Edward P. Tyson, MD
Eating Disorders Specialist

We had some issues with a mean boy at school telling my little girl she was fat. She was devastated. She is not fat but she is not waif thin as some of the kids at school. She kept saying she wanted to be skinny. I find this sad to be occurring in the first grade. A great counselor suggested this book to me. It was well received by my daughter. She decided she wanted to be healthy and strong instead of skinny. We loved the story of the little bluebird. The only thing I will mention is, for us, the last 2 pages or so could have been left off. It talked of the little bird going to a counselor, etc. We were not at that point (with an actual food disorder) but some may be, so I see why it was included. So glad my girl is comfortable in her own feathers.

TJ
Father

$10.95

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